Left Foot, Right Foot: Student Advice from @charbeck

Each year I get excited about designing a new math project for my gr. 7/8’s data unit. Last year, Super Mario was our theme. After meeting some inspirational teachers who are also runners at #unplugd11, I had help from @charbeck, @aforgrave and @AlanaCallan as we designed a cross-curricular math project using the students’ running data. The goal however, had to be on improvement. Every student needed to feel some success, whether it was distance or pace.

So each day in September, my students brought their bright yellow duotangs out to the track. As the students completed their run (which increased daily), I called out their time for them to record. Using Cool Running’s Pace Calculator, the students determined their daily pace.

Once October rolled in, we got to our data unit in math. Lessons included how to use Google Spreadsheets and formulas. Finally – I got to introduce the project. I was excited, but wondered, would they be? I got my answer when several students asked, “Can I start this tonight?” And they did.

I created and shared videos on how to create a spreadsheet and how to embed their spreadsheet in their blog. After reading their blogs, it was clear that this collaboratively designed project had met the goal: students were proud of themselves. They were runners. Jacob, Alyssa, Ed

Once the student blogs were posted, they pro-rated their pace to the distance required to run a marathon. Then I shared @charbeck’s results from his recently completed Toronto Waterfront Marathon. My kids were impressed! And shocked…when they found out Chris is also a grade 8 math teacher in Winnipeg. “Does he know Mr. Fisher (my Idea Hive teaching partner)”?

The next day after preparing questions, students had the chance to ask Mr. Harbeck about his preparation, race and recovery via Skype. One of my quieter students, who had recently completed his first 10 k, was jumping with excitement after Mr. Harbeck asked, and encouraged him on his own success.

Chris was humble, humorous, encouraging and inspiring.

After the call, when I asked the students, “What were you most surprised about?”, they shared what they learned from Mr. Harbeck…

The training is more enjoyable than the race.
Marathon running is a mental game broken down into 10 mile increments with a little prayer at mile 30.
Marathon runners have smelly gear and wear socks with an R on the foot (so they know what foot it goes on).
Mr. Harbeck shared his key strategy for completing the race: Left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot. It’s a mental game.

Thank-you to my #unplugd11 inspirational team for helping frame this project where all of my students experienced success.
Thank-you, Chris, for making my students feel so special and emphasizing the importance of positive thinking and setting goals.

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6 thoughts on “Left Foot, Right Foot: Student Advice from @charbeck

  1. I can second the excitement that Mrs. Durnin’s students were exhibiting…they couldn’t wait to share when I visited their room yesterday. Math at it’s best!

  2. Big, big smile here in London, Ontario.

    Not only are your students learning about themselves and making very personal connections to the curriculum, they’re being let in on an important secret. You are helping them to discover that teachers are real people, with real connections, and real passions.

    Here’s hoping they are further inspired to forge their own connections and to pursue their own passions…

  3. I love how self-directed your students are. Their questions were insightful to me as I learned what interests them. I really appreciate their interest in strategy. Maybe I could Skype in and let them ask me questions about high school, and library…

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